LJN National Gathering, Sunday 11th November – London

The next national gathering will take place on the 11th November at Friends of the Earth’s Offices in London from 12-5pm with option pub visit afterwards for the freelancers among us…

The meeting will be a chance for new and old members to meet, discuss, and make plans for the coming months of land justice action! If you’d like to get involved in LJN work over the next few months, we’d love to see you there.

It’d be massively helpful if you could quickly RSVP using the form below so we can send you the agenda ahead of time. And also so we can find enough comfy chairs for you all 😉 !

 

Report from The Landlords’ Game

On Saturday 14th April, after a week of rain, on what felt like the first warm and sunny day of the year, just shy of a hundred people gathered in central London for the inaugural Land Justice Network Landlords’ Game guided walk.

The meet point and official start was Brown Hart Gardens, a POPS (privately owned public space) in the heart of Mayfair.

Continue reading Report from The Landlords’ Game

Promo video for The Landlord’s Game

THE LANDLORD’S GAME: a tour of London’s land and housing crisis. Please share this wicked promo video via facebook or youtube and then come along on Saturday 14th April, Mayfair!

Facebook event page – https://www.facebook.com/events/154637835243225/

National gathering in March

Come to Land Justice Network’s next national gathering to celebrate the start of our Week of Action on Land Rights, discuss what the network’s been up to and plot fresh actions together!

We’ll meet up 12 noon to eat lunch together (bring a dish if you can) and start the meeting at 1pm, finishing 4pm with optional social time at a nearby pub afterwards.

Facebook event page is https://www.facebook.com/events/169320923865119/

If you need financial support so you can make it to the event please drop us an email at landjusticeuk@gmail.com

Friends of the Earth offices, The Printworks, 139 Clapham Road, London, SE1 0DG

Did the Mayor of London just say what I think he said?

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan joins calls for the government to make all property ownership in London transparent.

In particular, he urges the government to speed up plans for a new public register of the beneficial ownership of foreign companies that own UK property.

Roughly 44% of all the UK properties owned by overseas registered companies are located in London, according to recent research from the Land Registry.

Khan believes that in order to help prevent offences such as tax evasion and theft, the ownership of UK property should be more transparent.

Go to the original tweet.

Celebrate the 800th anniversary of the Charter of the Forest

Network member the New Putney Debates have put together a fine line up to celebrate the 800th anniversary of the Charter of the Forest.

They kick off with an event this Sunday 17th September which involves a boat trip from London out to Runnymede with more amazing speakers and contributors than you can shake a stick at:

Continue reading Celebrate the 800th anniversary of the Charter of the Forest

Report of discussions at Land for What on 12th-13th November 2016

On the weekend of 12th-13th November 2016, hundreds of people with diverse backgrounds and interests gathered to talk about the issues surrounding land, and to look for spaces for solutions. This report summarises some of the sessions from the weekend. Thanks to everyone who submitted a session summary. We hope it can be useful for people who weren’t able to make it to the event, and will help inspire further discussions.

Read the full report here

Get Your Facts Straight: Land Stats Everyone Should Know

Facts

  • 69% of land in the UK is owned by 0.6% of the population.
  • UK housing is concentrated on 5% of the country’s land mass.
  • Only 64% of people have a small stake in the 5% of land on which our housing is built.
  • Home and land ownership is in decline.
  • 1/3 of British land is still owned by aristocrats.
  • The value of ‘dwellings’ (homes and the land underneath them) has increased by four times (or 400%) between 1995 and 2015, from £1.2 trillion to £5.5 trillion.
  • The property wealth of the top 10% of households is nearly 5 times greater than the wealth of the bottom half of all households combined.
  • Landlords own almost 40% of all former council houses with the government’s ‘right-to-buy’ scheme.
  • The annual amount of overseas investment in the UK housing market has rise from around £6bn per year a decade ago to £32bn by 2014.
  • 74% of house price increases between 1950 and 2012 in the UK can be explained by rising land prices with the remainder attributable to increases in construction costs.
  • Land often increases in value due to public investment in infrastructure, such as roads, public transport, housing, etc. It has been estimated that the extension of the Jubilee Line of the London Underground which opened in 1999 increased local residential land values within 1000 yards of each of the stations by £13 billion (Riley, 2001). As a result, such publically funded infrastructure projects almost always involve a substantial transfer of wealth from a large number of taxpayers to a small number of land owners – a classic case of economic rent.

Sources:

Who really owns Britain?, Country Life, November 2010.

Modern Land Reform, New Economics Foundation, publication forthcoming.

Who Owns Britain, Kevin Cahill, 2001.

DIY Land Spotting: How To

This simple step-by-step guide is designed to help you spot disused land in your area and raise it as an issue with your local council and local land owners – the people with the power to bring it back into use. Spotting disused land is easy to do and can be done be anyone. Currently, the UK has large amounts of disused land that could be put to use in all sorts of ways: from building community-led affordable housing, to growing community gardens, to increasing local biodiversity. Whatever your goal, this step-by-step guide will help you identify disused land in your area and bring it back into use, as well as potentially feeding into a crowdsourced map of disused land in the UK.

Getting started

Who can spot land?

  1. Go solo! One person can achieve a lot. Decide on the geographical area that you want to spot empty land in. Decide how long a period you want to spend identifying sites – a week? a month? a year? Whatever time period you choose, the aim is to identify as many sites as you can within that time.
  2. Form a spotting group! This could be with your friends, family, colleagues, community group, or other people interested in land reform in your local area. The more people, the more disused land you will be able to identify. You could even meet up to share what you found out!

How to spot land?

You could spot land while:

  • On your way to work
  • Taking your kids to school
  • On dedicated land spotting walks in your area

 

What to gather information on?

It is important that you gather information on:

  1. The location of the site. This is the most important piece of information. The best way to record the location of the site is to place a pin on Google Maps and save it. This data can then be used to create a map of disused land across the UK.
  2. How long the site has been disused. This might be something that you know yourself or it might be something you can find out by asking local people or through Google.
  3. Who you think might own it. Again, this might be something you know, or it might be something you can find out by asking the neighbours or through the Land Registry.
  1. What it used to be used for. Again, this might be something that you know yourself or it might be something you can find out by asking local people or through Google.

 

How to make it an issue?

Gathering information is important, but to bring disused land back into use it is essential to make it into a pressing issue: for the landowner (who has the power to do something with the land), the local authority (who has the power of compulsory purchase if the landowner refuses to take action), and local citizens (who have the power to put pressure on local landowners and the council). In order to make disused land in your area into an issue, you could start by:

  • Taking a selfie in front of the disused land and tweeting it to #Land4What.
  • Finding out who owns the land using the Land Registry.
  • Telling your local councillors about all the empty land in your area and suggesting ideas for how it could be used (a community land trust housing development, a park, an allotment).
  • Using the template letters to local councils and landowners on the Land for What? website: https://www.landjustice.uk/category/resources/

 

Further resources

For more information on mapping land, check out the following links:

Who Owns England? – a blog attempting map land ownership in England.

Empty Homes – advice on how to bring empty homes back into use from a charity that campaigns on this issue nationally.

Plotfinder – a website for buying and selling land.

Quakers interest in Housing and Inequality

Dear Friends

Quakers have an interest in Housing and Inequality which led us to run a conference on 20th February this year, a little while before the recent Housing Act.

If you’re interested in what went on, you can have a look at the open Facebook Group Quakers and Housing Inequality.

One of the outcomes following our conference was a Housing Toolkit, a resource document for use by Quaker groups and individuals. It might interest some of you, so I’ve uploaded a copy to this site here – Quaker Housing Toolkit Part 1

Fred