‘English Dirt’ scratch performance in Leeds

The Vandal Factory theatre company are based in York/Leeds and consist of Natalie Quatermass and Henry Raby. They have just finished a week of research and development on a new show, English Dirt about the history of land-ownership. They are holding a work-in-progress sharing in Leeds on Saturday 14th September:

What: English Dirt is a performance collaboration between Flora Greysteel and Vandal Factory. This is a 40 minute, script in hand, work-in-progress performance. It explores the history of English land ownership and relates it to current crises such as climate, housing and nationalism. 

Where: Middle Floor Wharf Chamber, Leeds LS2 7EQ

When: 14th September. Doors 17:00, Joe Solo support act 17.30, English Dirt 18:00

Watch: A trailer from our work-in-progress at Derby Theatre can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Obv7dq8Pys

How much: This is a Pay What You Decide event. 

50% the proceeds will go to the Land Justice Network and 50% of the proceeds will go to launching English Dirt’s Kick-starter.

Accessibility: Unfortunately the space is not yet wheelchair accessible, however it was our only affordable option at this time and we will be seeking more accessible spaces in the future.  This is something the venue is seeking to address as soon as possible. We are very sorry if this means you are unable to attend and we can provide a recording of the live performance.

The next stage of development: We are looking to make a 75 minute performance of English Dirt in 2020. In order for this to happen, we need partners, collaborators and funding. We hope that this event will act as a means of instigating those conversations as well as us gathering some vital feedback from a friendly, critical audience.

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2299036403758481/?active_tab=about

Land rights briefing on the global south

The Land Research Action Network, Global Campaign for Agrarian Reform, Focus on the Global South, Rede Social de Justicia e Direitos Humanos and La Via Campesina have been collaborating to produce some excellent briefing papers recently. Below is the most recent, the rest can be found in the footer of this page.

https://www.landjustice.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/LandResearchActionNetwork_WEB.pdf

Initial Hebden landcamp debrief minutes

These minutes are from an online meeting on 2nd July, names have been redacted for publishing.

  1. check in and go around (not published)
  2. aims, history and objectives of landcamp
  3. what went well
  4. challenges
  5. next actions + visions

1 – check in and go around (redacted for public release)

2 – aims, history and objectives of landcamp

>>history – LJN land occupation group undertook first landcamp in 2018 on a piece of public land near Peterborough (ex military base) which had just been sold off unbeknownst to the team – decided to abandon occupation and try again in 2019

LJN direct action group did various successful actions in 2018.

Hebden project was direct action group and land occupation group collaborating for the first time.

Hebden location was decided at LJN national gathering in autumn 2018. Earlier conversations with Hebden locals had welcomed the idea of having a national group come to bring greater awareness to local issues with national resonance and importance. First hebden visit with open meeting and recce in January 2019 these continued over the next few months.

>>aims and objectives – raise awareness about land issues: mismanagement of land leading to increased flooding, lack of land ownership transparency, shooting a bad use of land, need more community control, destruction of moor connected to carbon store and climate change // aim for greater national and local awareness of issues // aim to start a long term land occupation camp, a place where front line activists could recuperate.

3 – what went well – this is a raw unedited dump of peoples feedback

120 people came – many report having a positive experience – good to be there and to shake things up a bit – welcoming and friendly – food and kitchen were really good – Saturday night was fun – important to connect moor to floods – stunning location – good people – commoners choir enjoyed the experience – interesting conversations reported – got lots of people talking – great that the land was taken – was a good thing to do – to take the land and to make the land the issue – good bonding experience – beautiful – good to be doing some direct action

4 – challenges – this is a raw unedited dump of people’s feedback without comment including many duplicates

key organisers struggled with comms with others and each other
key organisers weren’t realistic about their capacities
toilets, food and water weren’t in place with six days to go 
locals felt help offers were rebuffed by organisers
reliance on motor vehicles was a mistake, things should have been walked unto site 
volunteers weren’t fully briefed and asked to take a risk without knowing what was happening 
carbon store and climate emergency should have been key angle
action should have been focussed around the illegal drainage ditches on the moor
opportunity to do more with 120 people on the land
should have gone further and been bolder as activists
pre built compost toilets – why doesn’t the movement have them?
problem with safer spaces policy
too much secrecy and not enough information 
should have had clearer vision and aims conversations with hebden residents sooner
local hosts kept in the dark 
can’t be a spokesperson for something i don’t know or understand 
felt like cut and paste action not what’s best for this action 
openness of planning and decisions was not good enough 
hosted people but couldn’t find out what was going on
thoughts and feelings weren’t taken on board
local advice wasn’t taken on board e.g. fires on site etc 
not integrated enough with locals 
no defined roles 
individuals taking risks not the camp as a whole
not knowing what the piece of land was v. difficult 
it’s a small place so we bump into people
time of year was poor 
done at any expense rather than it happening for all the reasons the community wanted
(safer spaces policy was published in the camp handbook but implementation procedure was not.
handbook stated all decisions would be taken by consensus but this did not happen – additional commented added after by participant)

not enough people involved 
not enough hands on deck 
became reactive due to stress and tiredness 
social media stuff was very hard to manage 
rushed – needed more openness
coming back into a hostile local community
wrong time of year 
not enough people organising 
social media managed offsite raised problems and lead to not knowing where things were with farmer
total lack of capacity – rushed
shocked at how disorganised how it was and lack of plans 
had to call in a lot of favours
felt like I wasn’t listened to r.e. water 
local people should have been on the core team 
people dragged into helping unwillingly 
felt like a couple of people’s idea rather than something with wider buy in 
woodcraft folk’s 16-18 year olds camp far more organised and they were run by kids! 
spent a lot of time carrying things up the hill 
opportunity lost to achieve a lot more 
People doing lots of roles which they weren’t suited to 
plan for a media tent which never happened – 

Conversation

I – core of all the problems is logistics – still good it happened – many open letter people were initially involved

C – not enough trust, need more planning and putting the time in

A – online and social media stuff was toxic, open letters, Q’s experience doesn’t justify the group letter they coordinated, lots of crowd gathering online which was misguided

R – camp organisers lack of knowledge of rural communities – didn’t understand how much was being asked of local people

C – local opinion divided – some: storm in a teacup and manipulative – lots of exaggeration –

I – person Z asking for apology to farmer – Saville estate with 3 grand pianos – who should be apologising to who – why is the farmer poor? Middle class appearance of the network (noted that lead organiser is working class as were many others involved) – farmers should be allies

C – R2 doesn’t need to apologise for actions of lead organisers

A – how can we continue to act locally – public debrief? Shooting season action 12th august? Future plans – where does debrief info go –

R – how we can move forward?

K – repairing community rifts – how can we best do this? Public space

I – like to take forward in an open way – critique doesn’t have to be critical learning process

Public debrief

C – good idea – fine to have in autumn – time has past already – happy to turn up and participate – not capacity for coordinating – can do some tasks

A – public debrief is important – shame g and m can’t be here to say well done – happy for it to be autumn – letter signatories might step up on their own terms – can support this to happen – d wanted to be here and L too

I – debrief sooner would be good before 12th august if we are going to action

K – good to do something before

C – august 12th wasn’t thinking off…

R2 – landcamp has broken a lot of the key relationships in the network, many people involved still struggling with physical and mental health issues caused by trauma from their involvement and it’s hard to know what is left of the network at the moment – it is a much younger, smaller, dispersed, looser, less experienced and more fragile association of folk than people perceive it to be from the polished website and propaganda

I – R2 should make sure what they just said is minuted

R and A – get date in diary now agreed

A – do something with a local group

I – Sunday afternoon is best

R2 – public debrief – Sunday 8th September pm

A – local get together on tues 16th july – set up a whatsapp group

Put minutes on LJN website – one week to reply – initials not full names

C – interested but not committing now

R – publicise via XR and LJN

I – Invite people who we know – keep it smaller group

Human rights, land reform and Scotland

A major station for democratic progressive land reform to pass through is updating the human rights laws so that absolute right to property doesn’t trump every other human right, such as the right to housing and food etc…

Scotland is heading nicely along this road and we watch jealously from England, please read this recent article from the Scottish Land Commissioner Megan MacInnes –

Excellent new short film on Kinder Scout trespass and direct action

Have a look at this excellent short film by Well Red Films on Kinder Scout trespass and direct action

Mass Trespass from wellredfilms on Vimeo.

https://www.facebook.com/wellredfilms/
https://twitter.com/wellredfilms

Land Justice Network is recruiting a coordinator

Job Description

Time: 40 hours per month, one year contract subject to 2 month probationary period

Pay: £10 p/h (£11.45 p/h higher rate for London) – you will need to invoice as a self employed worker

Interview date will be Thursday 28th June in central London and we have a budget to cover some travel expenses from those coming from out of town.

Place of work: Remote working at home and networking events, some travel costs reimbursed

Reports to: Land Justice Network Coordinator Support Group with additional monthly updates for network members

Continue reading Land Justice Network is recruiting a coordinator