The Landlord’s Game: A tour of London’s land & housing crisis

Join us for a walking tour of London’s land and housing crisis on Saturday 14th April 2018, 1pm-4pm. START 1pm Brown Hart Gardens on Duke St, nr Bond St Tube W1K 6TD.

Facebook event page –

London faces a housing crisis of epic proportions, with homelessness rife, house prices sky-high and many people unable to afford a home.

At root, the housing crisis is a land crisis. London is home to millions of people – but the land on which it’s built is effectively monopolised by a handful of wealthy estates.

Join us for a tour of some of the most expensive locations on the Monopoly board: places that Dukes and Earls inherited as fields hundreds of years ago, but now – thanks to a lucky roll of the dice – is some of the hottest super-prime real estate on the planet.

It’s time for change. The Land Justice Network has organised this tour to showcase some of the root causes of London’s land and housing crisis – and call for reform.

Along our route, you’ll see Mayfair mansions left empty for nearly 15 years, discover properties owned in offshore tax havens, and find out the truth about who owns London – and what we can do about it.

National gathering in March

Come to Land Justice Network’s next national gathering to celebrate the start of our Week of Action on Land Rights, discuss what the network’s been up to and plot fresh actions together!

We’ll meet up 12 noon to eat lunch together (bring a dish if you can) and start the meeting at 1pm, finishing 4pm with optional social time at a nearby pub afterwards.

Facebook event page is

If you need financial support so you can make it to the event please drop us an email at

Friends of the Earth offices, The Printworks, 139 Clapham Road, London, SE1 0DG

Video on Scottish land rights – Snowboarding, bothies and the right to roam

I hope we can one day make a video this compelling about land rights in England!

Right to Roam from Patagonia on Vimeo.

A picnic for Captain Pouch

On Sunday 12th November, the day after our Land Justice Network Leicester gathering, a group of us will be trespassing onto the lands of Boughton House, the location of the slaughter of 50 commoners, 410 years ago. We will take the train from Leicester to Kettering, one stop down on the London line, and walk into the grounds owned now by the Duke of Buccleugh, one of the largest retainers of private land in the UK, for a cheese-themed picnic, in honour of Captain Pouch and the commoners that lost their lives in the battle against enclosure.

If you are interested in staying overnight, and trespassing with us, please bring sleeping bags and roll mats to indoor camp at this address: Graceworks, Wycliffe URC, The Common, Evington, Leicester LE5 6EA. And for the walk, remember sturdy shoes and water, and some choice cheeses!

This picnic will be a gentle walk in the country, with no intention of public fanfare and confrontation with the landowners (perfectly feasible due to the acreage of the property). It will be a first foray into direct action, a nice little practice for what the group has planned next.

Also, please register your interest with Nick Hayes so he can tell you when and where to meet,

thank you!

Historical Context, or, why cheese?

Across the Midlands in 1607, large numbers of commoners were gathering to tear up the fence posts that had enclosed so much of their commons in recent years. 14 years earlier, the Tudor dynasty had relaxed the enclosure laws, and common land had been swallowed into private ownership, never to return.

In Kettering, Sir Thomas Tresham was the pantomime villain landlord, widely reviled. By 1597, he was grazing over six hundred sheep in the parish and had been prosecuted in the star chamber for this but to no avail, because a decade later, the whole parish was fenced off for sheep, with no lettings to commoners for their grazing needs. In 1599, he bought another swathe of land from his neighbouring cousin, also Thomas Tresham, which allowed him to destroy five more tenant farms, and enclose the land for his sheep. With poor harvests and a growing population served by ever diminishing commons, the Midlands was a hotbed of discontent, and in 1607, led by the mystic figure of Captain Pouch, peaceful protests of up to 5000 people occurred in Warwickshire, Leicestershire and Northamptonshire, pulling up fences and routing hedgerows. Captain Pouch, aka John Reynolds, was the charismatic leader of this disorder, picking the sites of disorder strategically, to make the most political impact. A tinker by trade, uneducated, he carried with him a leather pouch in which he claimed was a special substance that gave him and his followers the protection of God and the Crown. By the time of the Newton Revolt, Reynolds was already in custody, and the 1000 locals that met in Rockingham Forest were leaderless, and this time armed, prepared to die for their beliefs.

James 1st commanded the Montagus, another wealthy family of the area, to suppress these people by whatever means necessary, They had trouble drumming up a militia from the local population, but when they did, they met the rebels on June 8th, 1607. After twice reading the royal proclamation commanding the people to disband, the troops charged on horseback, murdering 50 to 60 people, and injuring many more. Most of the survivors were pardoned, provided they signed their names on a list, now kept in Boughton House. Several of the ringleaders were hanged, and with them, John Reynolds, was hanged drawn and quartered. After his death, the contents of his pouch were revealed to be nothing more than a lump of locally made green cheese.

In some ways, the revolt was a success. Just two months after the uprising, King James ordered a royal inquiry into the state of enclosure, which lead to several landlords being prosecuted by the star chamber, and fined. However, none of the land was returned to common grazing, and these fines amounted to nothing more than a tax on enclosure for a paltry few of the landlords guilty of land grabbing. England was given its scapegoats, and the system of enclosure was, if anything, reinforced. The Tresham’s power faded into obscurity over the next century, whilst the Montagus thrived, Boughton Hall becoming, through marriage, the English seat of the Dukes of Buccleuch, one of the most prominent land owning dynasties of the UK.

Scottish land reform updates

(both updates via the excellent Senscot weekly briefing)

When the Community Empowerment Act extended the right to buy to all of Scotland – there was an optimism about what this could mean for communities in our cities. However, news this week that the community buy-out of Edinburgh’s Sick Kids Hospital has been thwarted is a further dent to this optimism – and not the first example of this in the city. Once again property developers have won the day. Questions need to be asked about whether or not the Act – in urban areas – has bitten off more than it can chew.

More info at

Andy Wightman, Scotland’s intrepid land reform campaigner, claims in a report published this week that there are almost 4000 derelict sites in Scotland; the Scottish Greens want to give local councils the power to tax them – a ‘vacant site levy’. According to their research, 70% of this land is suitable for development – and taxing it would generate £200m a year to build affordable homes. In Jan 2016, the Greens tried to amend the land reform bill to tax vacant land – but the SNP rejected it. The worsening shortage of affordable housing suggests that this report will get some serious consideration.

Guide to adding events to the Land Justice Network website events page

  • If you don’t already have one, request a wordpress website login from one of the administrators.
  • Please enter the venue location information first through:
    menu/My Calendar/Manage Locations
    Note – please add website URL and if able, information about wheelchair access and other accessibility info.
  • Next add the event information via
    menu/My Calendar/Add New Event
  • Choose a suitable event title. Please look at previous event titles to try and keep continuity, for example: ‘Land for What? at a Festival’ or ‘Brighton Land for What?’
  • We haven’t set up the event listing to show preview text so there is no need to put anything into the big box
  • You don’t need to add an image
  • Choose whoever you think is most appropriate as a host and use Ivor Mansion otherwise.
  • Choose a category – there is one for each working group (Land for What? is considered to be the education and outreach name) plus a category for members meetings. Please consult with others before adding more as we don’t want this to get out of hand.
  • Add a URL for the event. This is what people will click through to and can be a page or post on our site, a link to another website and even take people straight to the eventbrite page. I would recommend not sending people straight to event brite pages first as this will not work well after the event has happened, and I imagine that some people will still want to learn about past events after they have happened. Again, look at how things are currently set up to get an idea of best practice.
  • Add date and time – if the event is a two (or more) day event the use the recurring section. For example a two day weekend event ‘Repeats 1 times, every 1 Days’.
  • Event access – we have not managed any of these things yet, something to consider for the future. Please note that the location management section has the wheelchair and disability access information not the event.
  • Event Location – choose the venue you already entered
  • Click ‘Save Event’, then go and have a cup of tea/biscuit to celebrate.

Next network meeting and Leicester Land for What? information

Saturday 11th November @ Graceworks, Leicester
(Wycliffe URC, The Common, Evington, Leicester, LE5 6EA)

10.00am – Land for What?
An introduction to land as a common ground social justice issue
11.45am – Biscuits and tea
12.00am – Understanding the housing crisis in song and pie charts
1.00pm – Shared pot-luck lunch
(Bring a dish if you can… there will be plenty of food provided if you can’t)
2.00pm – Land Justice Network meeting (2-3 hrs)
Agenda to be participatory agendered soon

Please reserve your place here –

There is the possibility of a minibus coming up from Brighton via London. Please email if you are interested, letting us know whether you’d prefer to go up Friday evening or Saturday morning.

Also worth dropping us a line if you can offer a car share or need assistance with travel costs (we have some budget to support expenses).

There’s a Three Acres And A Cow show at the same venue on the evening before if you fancy – – Friday 10th November.